Brown hyaena survey - Skeleton Coast Park

Sunday 28 June 2020

Brown hyaena survey

In association with the Skeleton Coast Brown Hyaena Project and the Ministry of Environment & Tourism a survey of the brown hyaena population was initiated with an initial assessment of density and distribution along the coast between More Bay and the mouth of the Kunene River. The frequency of fresh brown hyaena tracks (≤ 24 hours) were counted along the coastline to determine presence and areas of concentration. Several freshwater springs were assessed for activities and camera-traps were mounted to record brown hyaena activities. The tracks of cheetahs were observed along several ephemeral rivers, including the Engo, Munutum, Khumib and Hoaruseb Rivers.

Skeleton Coast Brown Hyaena Project
Skelon Coast Brown Hyaena Project Brown Hyaena at the skeleon coast


Counting brown hyaena tracks along the coast
Brown Hyaena tracks Whale bone Brown Hyaena tracks

Checking freshwater springs in the Skeleton Coast Park
Skelton Coast fresh water spring Skelton Coast fresh water spring Skelton Coast fresh water spring

Greater flamingos at the mouth of the Kunene River


The Kunene River

Remains of a green turtle on the beach south of the Kunene
Remains of a green turtle

Coastal lions

Two lionesses in the northern section of the study area continues to hunt and capture Cape fur seals along the coast.



Green flash

The rare optical phenomena known as a “green flash”, where a green shimmer or ray can be seen above the rim of the sun due to refraction, was observed at sunset near More Bay and at the mouth of the Kunene River in the Skeleton Coast National Park.

Green flash at sunset along the Skeleton Coast
Green flash at sunset along the Skeleton Coast

 

Humpback whale
A single Humpback whale was observed breeching seven times in quick succession near Terrace Bay.

Humpback whale breaching near Terrace Bay
Humpback whale breaching near Terrace Bay Humpback whale breaching near Terrace Bay Humpback whale breaching near Terrace Bay